Categories
Uncategorized

Welcome

Welcome to the new web site for Brevard Scribblers. We hope you like the new look, which has been designed to offer ease of navigation and reading. Whether you are an existing member or you would like to join us, everything you need is here. Use the menu – on the top or left side of this page – depending on whether you are using a PC, Tablet or Mobile Device/Phone – to find meeting dates, competition and publishing opportunities (including how to submit work for our own annual anthology) and contact details for committee members. If you are interested you can also read about our history, as a club in Brevard County, which stretches back to the early eighties.

This is our blog page where you can find regular posts about our most recent activities and what we are planning in the near future. Please follow us using the link at the bottom of this page to keep up to date with all of our news and activities.

Scroll down for our blog updates, which will include reminders of upcoming meetings. Blogs will become archived once we have published a certain number of them, so you will always be able to see the most recent blogs in their entirety on this page (below) and refer back to older ones if you want to.

Like and Share us on Facebook

By Brevard Scribblers

Welcome to Scribblers of Brevard

Scribblers of Brevard is a writers' club based in Melbourne, Florida, a place where writers can go to read their works and gain encouragement, inspiration and advice from fellow writers. We strive to provide helpful critiques and improve our craft through the sharing of information and experiences. Our members include novices and published authors alike and welcomes anyone who has an interest in writing. We meet every second and fourth Saturday (except for November and December) at the Eau Gallie Public Library on Pineapple Ave. We gather at 9:30 for coffee and socializing after which our meeting begins at 10:00 and usually runs until 11:45.

Scribblers of Brevard is a writers' club based in Melbourne, Florida, a place where writers can go to read their works and gain encouragement, inspiration and advice from fellow writers. We strive to provide helpful critiques and improve our craft through the sharing of information and experiences. Our members include novices and published authors alike and welcomes anyone who has an interest in writing. We meet every second and fourth Saturday (except for November and December) at the Eau Gallie Public Library on Pineapple Ave. We gather at 9:30 for coffee and socializing after which our meeting begins at 10:00 and usually runs until 11:45.

Scribblers of Brevard is a writers' club based in Melbourne, Florida, a place where writers can go to read their works and gain encouragement, inspiration and advice from fellow writers. We strive to provide helpful critiques and improve our craft through the sharing of information and experiences. Our members include novices and published authors alike and welcomes anyone who has an interest in writing. We meet every second and fourth Saturday (except for November and December) at the Eau Gallie Public Library on Pineapple Ave. We gather at 9:30 for coffee and socializing after which our meeting begins at 10:00 and usually runs until 11:45. We publish an anthology of our works every year and share details of competitions and publishing successes.

2 replies on “Welcome”

This is excellent, Elayne. I salute you for attempting to better define what good poetry is. Too often, creative folks reject the notion that there are any guidelines by which we can evaluate poetry. Poems are not good because some official ‘poetry pundit bureau’ says so, but that doesn’t mean there are no criteria. Through the years, well-crafted poems have touched, enlightened, and changed us. It may seem like magic, but careful study will reveal that great poems are great because the author has carefully adhered to identifiable, time-tested rules.

Like

Thank you Rick. I thought it was a provocative subject but one that was worth expanding on. I think some self-published ‘poets’ can be very defensive of their work and their right to call it poetry even if it shows little commitment to the form and hasn’t been through any kind of editorial scrutiny. I especially liked your idea about reading someone else’s work aloud at writer’s meetings, for example, because that’s a really good way of testing, for example, whether or not a poem has achieved rhythm. Someone who hasn’t written a given poem for example, will read it as it’s been written, following the punctuation and line endings that are there. If the poem doesn’t possess rhythm, it will show in the reading. I think also that blank and free verse have often been incorrectly interpreted to mean ‘anything goes.’

Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s